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The Socialist SystemThe Political Economy of Communism$
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Janos Kornai

Print publication date: 1992

Print ISBN-13: 9780198287766

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2003

DOI: 10.1093/0198287763.001.0001

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Shortage and Inflation: The Phenomena

Shortage and Inflation: The Phenomena

Chapter:
(p.228) 11 Shortage and Inflation: The Phenomena
Source:
The Socialist System
Author(s):

János Kornai (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/0198287763.003.0011

Shortage is explained basically in terms of the inherent characteristics of the classical socialist system. The examination concentrates on the system's constant, lasting features, with factors influencing short‐term fluctuations in shortage phenomena covered, at most, in passing. Attention is trained on parts of the phenomena that distinguish socialism from other systems (primarily capitalism), and the focus in the analysis of production is mainly on the publicly owned sector. The different sections of the chapter are shortage phenomena and the shortage economy; the process of demand adjustment; horizontal and vertical shortage; shortage and surplus; market regimes: the buyer's and seller's market; normal shortage and normal surplus; and open, declared, and hidden inflation.

Keywords:   classical socialism, demand adjustment, inflation, market regimes, shortage, socialist systems, surplus

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