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Hartford PuritanismThomas Hooker, Samuel Stone, and Their Terrifying God$
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Baird Tipson

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780190212520

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190212520.001.0001

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Concluding Reflections

Concluding Reflections

Chapter:
(p.398) 13 Concluding Reflections
Source:
Hartford Puritanism
Author(s):

Baird Tipson

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190212520.003.0013

The final chapter offers thoughts on some broader issues. Despite common assumptions about the significance of the “errand” into the New England wilderness, can one actually detect discernible differences in Hooker’s positions after 1633? What should be made of his continuing to use polarizing tactics in Hartford and of his questioning the godliness of most members of the Connecticut plantation? Does it continue to be appropriate for Connecticut to celebrate him as an early proponent of “democracy”? Is it helpful to imagine Hooker and Stone as “perfect Protestants”? Does Hooker’s obsession with personal salvation blind him to a deeper obligation to the poor? Finally, on a point of high importance to historians of American religion, how might one best describe the relationship of the Hartford ministers to later “evangelicalism”?

Keywords:   democracy, poor, errand into the wilderness, Evangelicalism, perfect Protestantism

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