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Identified versus Statistical LivesAn Interdisciplinary Perspective$
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I. Glenn Cohen, Norman Daniels, and Nir Eyal

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780190217471

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: April 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190217471.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 03 December 2021

From Biology to Policy

From Biology to Policy

Ethical and Economic Issues in HIV Treatment-as-Prevention

Chapter:
(p.203) 14 From Biology to Policy
Source:
Identified versus Statistical Lives
Author(s):

Till Bärnighausen

Max Essex

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190217471.003.0015

HIV antiretroviral treatment (ART) can prevent the onward transmission of HIV. This prevention potential of treatment raises several ethical and economic questions. How and how strongly should HIV-infected individuals be motivated to initiate ART for prevention of onward transmission of HIV alone (i.e. during disease stages when they do not yet need ART for their own health)? Considering both treatment and prevention effects of ART, how should ART be prioritized across different populations? How can identified victim effects bias be avoided in the resource allocation to HIV treatment for prevention? This chapter describes and discusses these and related issues, which will increasingly gain policy importance as countries with high HIV prevalence are considering treatment-as-prevention strategies

Keywords:   HIV, treatment as prevention, population health ethics, ethics and economics, HIV transmission and identifiability

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