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Envy at Work and in Organizations$
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Richard H. Smith, Ugo Merlone, and Michelle K. Duffy

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780190228057

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: August 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190228057.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 16 June 2021

Disposable Diapers, Envy and the Kibbutz

Disposable Diapers, Envy and the Kibbutz

What Happens to an Emotion Based on Difference in a Society Based on Equality?

Chapter:
(p.399) 17 Disposable Diapers, Envy and the Kibbutz
Source:
Envy at Work and in Organizations
Author(s):

Josh Gressel

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190228057.003.0017

This chapter explores envy on kibbutzim (plural of kibbutz) in Israel via semi-structured interviews with 17 current and former kibbutz members. It investigates whether the reduction in social and economic inequality in kibbutzim brings a reduction or elimination of envy. Every person interviewed agreed that envy still exists on the kibbutz, and the majority felt that it is stronger there than elsewhere. Possible causes given include: smaller differences are more visible; the ideology of equality makes inequality more painful; ideology can be a camouflage for envy; standing out from the norm can cause envy; the increased social propinquity can be both a cause of increased envy and friction and a means of exacting punishment because of it. A minority of respondents felt the kibbutz had less envy than the rest of Israeli society.

Keywords:   envy, Kibbutz, political ideology, economic inequality, social propinquity

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