Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Values, Political Action, and Change in the Middle East and the Arab Spring$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Mansoor Moaddel and Michele J. Gelfand

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780190269098

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: February 2017

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190269098.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 20 January 2022

Modernization, World System, and Clash of Civilization Perspectives in Lay Views of the Development–Morality Nexus in the United States and the Middle East

Modernization, World System, and Clash of Civilization Perspectives in Lay Views of the Development–Morality Nexus in the United States and the Middle East

Chapter:
(p.101) Chapter 4 Modernization, World System, and Clash of Civilization Perspectives in Lay Views of the Development–Morality Nexus in the United States and the Middle East
Source:
Values, Political Action, and Change in the Middle East and the Arab Spring
Author(s):

Arland Thornton

Kathryn M. Yount

Linda Young-DeMarco

Mansoor Moaddel

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190269098.003.0005

This chapter examines the relationship between laypeople’s perceptions of national development and morality. The authors studied whether people perceive national development and morality as complementary or conflicting. They situated their research within the theoretical frameworks of modernization, world system, and the clash of moralities, the latter being a modified version of clash of civilization. These frameworks offer different predictions about how people see the relationship between development and morality. Using survey data, the authors examined how these predictions conform to the ways in which morality and development are connected in the perceptions of Egyptians, Lebanese, Saudi Arabians, and Americans. These data suggest that in each country, one or more of these perspectives is reflected in laypeople’s perceptions, but the distribution of perceptions varies across the countries. Most Americans perceive the association between development and morality as positive, suggesting views that are consistent with modernization theory. The data from the three Middle Eastern countries reveal extensive heterogeneity of viewpoints—some consistent with modernization theory, others with world system theory, others with clashes of morality, and others that combine the three perspectives. These findings are important in today’s globalized world; perceptions of diverse cultures shape national priorities and international relations.

Keywords:   development, Middle East, morality, United States, world culture

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .