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Morality After CalvinTheodore Beza's Christian Censor and Reformed Ethics$
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Kirk M. Summers

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780190280079

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190280079.001.0001

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Conclusion

Conclusion

Beza’s Ethical Thought

Chapter:
(p.360) Conclusion
Source:
Morality After Calvin
Author(s):

Kirk M. Summers

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190280079.003.0010

The last chapter reviews the arguments of the book. A well-formulated, consistently articulated ethical theory guided all of Beza’s writing, preaching, and pastoral activity. Although he stressed that salvation is obtained solely through Christ’s imputed righteousness, he also recognized that God requires the faithful to work out their salvation by running in the stadium of righteousness. Only in a life committed to obedience, therefore, can God’s people know the peace and contentment that he intended for them; to live outside the boundaries established by God in his wisdom is to invite disorder and confusion. The faithful learn God’s will for them through the Genesis story, the order of Nature, the Mosaic Law, the Holy Spirit’s work in conforming them to the image of Christ, and the discipline and teaching of the Church.

Keywords:   righteousness, obedience, Reformed ethics, Genesis, the order of Nature, image of Christ, ecclesiology

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