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Morality After CalvinTheodore Beza's Christian Censor and Reformed Ethics$
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Kirk M. Summers

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780190280079

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190280079.001.0001

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Chapter:
(p.294) 7 Outliers
Source:
Morality After Calvin
Author(s):

Kirk M. Summers

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190280079.003.0008

This chapter looks at three unique groups censured in Beza’s Cato: drunks, Jesuits, and Epicureans, all of which in their own way challenge God’s authority in the world. First, it examines a series of poems in which Beza dehumanizes and carnivalizes drunks in order to underscore their potential to disrupt social order. Next, it reviews Beza’s interactions with the Jesuits, including his famous encounter with Luca Pinelli in 1580 and his treatise against John Hay in 1586. It also looks at the controversy over the rumor about Beza’s death spread by the Jesuit Clement Depuy and the problems created by the pedagogical work of Juan Maldonat in France. Several poems by Beza reveal his utter disdain for the sect. Finally, the chapter examines the intellectual challenge posed by the Epicureans. It is decided that the Calvinists reserved this label for those who doubted God’s pervasive providential care of the world.

Keywords:   Epicureanism, Drunkeness, Jesuits, John Hay, Juan Maldonat, Luca Pinelli, Clement Depuy

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