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Morality After CalvinTheodore Beza's Christian Censor and Reformed Ethics$
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Kirk M. Summers

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780190280079

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190280079.001.0001

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A Retrospective View of Life’s Journey

A Retrospective View of Life’s Journey

Chapter:
(p.336) 8 A Retrospective View of Life’s Journey
Source:
Morality After Calvin
Author(s):

Kirk M. Summers

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190280079.003.0009

This chapter brings together and analyzes several poems and passages by Beza written in the latter years of his life. These include the preface to his 1598 New Testament, a poem on a hen and her chicks written for his seventy-sixth birthday, the “climacteric” poem of 1582, and a poem on Christ’s blood written for his seventieth birthday. Certain threads run through all poems. Beza recognizes that only Christ’s immense sacrifice can cover his sins and that God and God alone has control of his future. Even so, from the vantage point of old age, Beza appraises his successes and failures. The moral growth that he experienced in his journey and the process of being gradually shaped and molded by the Holy Spirit to the image of Christ, while it does not save him, reassures him of his election as a child of God.

Keywords:   old age, assurance of faith, climacteric, sanctification, election, image of Christ

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