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Managed SpeechThe Roberts Court's First Amendment$
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Gregory P. Magarian

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780190466794

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2017

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190466794.001.0001

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My House, My Rules

My House, My Rules

Strengthening Government Managers’ Control over Institutional Speech

Chapter:
(p.69) Chapter 3 My House, My Rules
Source:
Managed Speech
Author(s):

Gregory P. Magarian

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190466794.003.0003

This chapter begins the second part of the book, which examines the government’s heightened power to regulate speech in “government preserves.” This chapter considers the Roberts Court’s treatment of the First Amendment rights of prisoners, public school students, and government workers. The Supreme Court has long taken a very narrow view of these institutional subjects’ First Amendment rights, and the Roberts Court has weakened their rights even further. This Court has deferred almost completely to the government’s managerial authority to restrict speech in prisons, public schools, and public workplaces however it sees fit, restricting the ability of government institutional subjects to contribute their distinctive insights to public discussion.

Keywords:   U.S. Supreme Court, Roberts Court, First Amendment, free speech, government preserves, prisoners, public schools, public employees

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