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RaciolinguisticsHow Language Shapes Our Ideas About Race$
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H. Samy Alim, John R. Rickford, and Arnetha F. Ball

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780190625696

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: December 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190625696.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 18 October 2021

“Suddenly Faced with a Chinese Village”

“Suddenly Faced with a Chinese Village”

The Linguistic Racialization of Asian Americans

Chapter:
(p.97) 5 “Suddenly Faced with a Chinese Village”
Source:
Raciolinguistics
Author(s):

Adrienne Lo

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190625696.003.0006

This chapter examines how Whites positioned Asian American residents of a community in California as toxic and unwelcome neighbors. It looks at the kinds of moral evaluations that they made as they positioned Asian Americans as nefarious businessmen; as greedy “newcomers” who did not “care” about the community; and as hypercompetitive students who were not well-rounded. Whites associated speaking an Asian language with deception and secrecy and framed displays of Asian languages in public space as inappropriate. While some research has claimed higher-income Asian Americans are assimilating rapidly and that increasing rates of Asian American residential segregation are voluntary choices, this chapter suggests that racialization is still a potent force.

Keywords:   Asian American, White, racialization, listening subject, model minority, assimilation, California, multilingualism

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