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Complicit SistersGender and Women's Issues across North-South Divides$
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Sara de Jong

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780190626563

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2017

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190626563.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use.date: 29 January 2022

Feminist Trajectories

Feminist Trajectories

Chapter:
(p.15) Chapter 2 Feminist Trajectories
Source:
Complicit Sisters
Author(s):

Sara de Jong

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190626563.003.0002

This chapter offers an overview of the history of transnational feminism and gender and development as well as the political struggles and dilemmas that have emerged in this context in order to contextualize the interviewed women’s work and feminist biographies. It argues that common narrations of the transnational history of women and development tend to repeat the same benchmarks and debates, leaving out particular regions and dimensions and reinforcing the separation between development and migration. Instead, this chapter connects this global gender and development narrative with the corresponding debates within women’s movements in the global North, in relation to migration and ethnic minorities. Drawing on the interview narratives, the chapter argues that the different generations of women in this study reflect distinct feminist and work trajectories and that their narrations demonstrate the continued relevance of key feminist debates concerning institutionalization, backlashes, essentialism, and inclusion/separatism.

Keywords:   GAD, gender and development, migration, ethnic minority, transnational feminism, women’s movement, postfeminism, generation, backlash, essentialism

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