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Only the Ball Was WhiteA History of Legendary Black Players and All-Black Professional Teams$
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Robert Peterson

Print publication date: 1992

Print ISBN-13: 9780195076370

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195076370.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 18 January 2022

Pioneers In Black And White

Pioneers In Black And White

Chapter:
(p.16) 2 Pioneers In Black And White
Source:
Only the Ball Was White
Author(s):

Robert Peterson

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195076370.003.0014

The chapter discusses how baseball started in the United States during the war as the game spread in army camps and military prisons. When the National Association of Base Ball Players was faced with the question of how it was to deal with colored players, it chose the side of repression and banned black players from joining. Being Negro was already a political issue during that time but the reason for this decision was discrimination. As a result, Negroes just played among themselves. However, this move was frowned upon by local publications. The chapter also tells about Moses Fleetwood Walker who became the first Negro major league baseball player. Others followed in his footsteps including Bud Fowler, George W. Stovey, and Frank Grant.

Keywords:   baseball, Negro, political issue, Moses Fleetwood Walker, Bud Fowler, George W. Stovey, Frank Grant, major league baseball

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