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DoctoringThe Nature of Primary Care Medicine$
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Eric J. Cassell

Print publication date: 1997

Print ISBN-13: 9780195113235

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195113235.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 14 June 2021

The Heavy Hand of the Past: Thinking About Diseases Versus Thinking About Persons

The Heavy Hand of the Past: Thinking About Diseases Versus Thinking About Persons

Chapter:
(p.43) 2 The Heavy Hand of the Past: Thinking About Diseases Versus Thinking About Persons
Source:
Doctoring
Author(s):

ERIC J. CASSELL

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195113235.003.0003

The problem of designing educational systems to teach methods is complicated by the fact that the kind of knowledge by which physicians know disease and the output of technology is different from and often in conflict with the kind of knowledge by which persons are known. Knowing the history of this conflict, as well as how it is expressed in medical practice is important to educators if students and physicians-in-training are not to be constantly subverted by the lure of “hard data”. Many of the functions people want primary care physicians to perform are contradicted by medical science as it is still taught to students and house officers. Physicians have great difficulty discovering the necessary information about the sick person and entering it into the calculus of their medical judgments so that it has equal weight with information about disease, pathophysiology, and technology.

Keywords:   medical practice, educational systems, medical science, pathophysiology, technology

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