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Distinctiveness and Memory$
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R. Reed Hunt and James B. Worthen

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780195169669

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195169669.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 02 December 2020

Distinctiveness Effects in Children's Memory

Distinctiveness Effects in Children's Memory

Chapter:
(p.236) (p.237) 11 Distinctiveness Effects in Children's Memory
Source:
Distinctiveness and Memory
Author(s):

Mark L. Howe

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195169669.003.0011

This chapter discusses the importance of distinctiveness in the development of memory in childhood. It outlines what research does exist on children's memory and distinctiveness, both in more traditional paradigms (for example, isolation effects, bizarre imagery, and similarity and difference judgments) and in some less-traditional areas (intentional forgetting, recoding, and false memories). These data are reviewed in two contexts: immediate memory and long-term retention of information over protracted periods of time. The chapter then considers the theoretical importance of distinctiveness effects in memory development and briefly describes two recent theories that can account for these developments. Finally, it discusses the importance of localizing distinctiveness effects in the basic memory processes of encoding, storage, and retrieval.

Keywords:   distinctiveness, children's memory, distinctiveness effects, immediate memory, retention, encoding, storage, retrieval, memory development

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