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Music in American Religious Experience$
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Philip V. Bohlman, Edith Blumhofer, and Maria Chow

Print publication date: 2005

Print ISBN-13: 9780195173048

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2008

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195173048.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use.date: 07 July 2022

 When Women Recite

 When Women Recite

“Music” and Islamic Immigrant Experience

Chapter:
(p.23) 1 When Women Recite
Source:
Music in American Religious Experience
Author(s):

Regula Burckhardt Qureshi

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195173048.003.0003

By focusing on the celebration of the birthday of the Prophet Muhammad (milad) by South Asian Muslim women in Edmonton, Canada, this chapter refocuses the usual consideration of Islam as public and male-oriented. Immigrant and ethnic Canadian Muslim women gather in homes and perform the prayers and recited texts that are not strictly considered music, employing texts and styles that are gathered from different traditions. The Arabic and Urdu languages are used separately and together, and distinctive styles and genres of worship are mixed to create musical practices traditional in Islam and new to Canada. The creativity of the Muslim women is considerable as it further creates new spaces for Islam that then becomes part of their religious and immigrant experiences in Canada.

Keywords:   Arabic, Canada, Islam, milad, Prophet Muhammad, prayer, recited texts, South Asian, Urdu, women

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