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Becoming EcologicalAn Expedition Into Community Psychology$
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James G. Kelly

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780195173796

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195173796.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 21 January 2022

A Summing Up

A Summing Up

Some Facets of Interdependence

Chapter:
(p.280) A Summing Up
Source:
Becoming Ecological
Author(s):

G. Kelly James

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195173796.003.0019

The concept of interdependence is the cornerstone of the ecological perspective. In biology, it represents the fundamental notion of life, particularly the exchange of nutrients and energy in an ecosystem. Roy Rappaport rightly maintains that “the ecosystem concept itself is a vital element in the construction, maintenance and reconstruction of the webs of life upon which, by whatever name we call them, we are absolutely dependent.” This axiom defines ecological biology and serves as an ecological perspective for community psychology. Thinking ecologically in psychology has been at the margins of preferred thinking. With the exception of a few notable researchers, psychology has only recently become a potential host for ecological thinking. The concept of interdependence has been employed in other fields and disciplines, however. For example, environmentalist James G. Speth has provided connections between economic indicators and sustainable environmental resources.

Keywords:   interdependence, ecological perspective, life, ecosystem, Roy Rappaport, community psychology, James Speth, ecological biology

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