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Luria's Legacy in the 21st Century$
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Anne-Lise Christensen, Elkhonon Goldberg, and Dmitri Bougakov

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780195176704

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: February 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195176704.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 28 November 2021

Cognitive and Motivational Functions of the Human Prefrontal Cortex

Cognitive and Motivational Functions of the Human Prefrontal Cortex

Chapter:
(p.30) 4 Cognitive and Motivational Functions of the Human Prefrontal Cortex
Source:
Luria's Legacy in the 21st Century
Author(s):

Jared X. Van Snellenberg

Tor D. Wager

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195176704.003.0004

The decades since Luria's seminal work in neuropsychology have brought tremendous advances in the understanding of prefrontal cortex (PFC) function. This chapter reviews meta-analytic, functional neuroimaging, and other neuropsychological and neuroscience data in order to discuss the putative functions of a set of PFC regions involved in cognition, motivation, and emotion. It is argued that PFC function is best understood by looking at the involvement of specific regions across a wide range of tasks, rather than restricting interpretations of function to specific task domains (e.g. working memory, task switching, etc.). In this light, processing in PFC is proposed to be roughly hierarchical, with posterior PFC regions being involved in motor response selection while more anterior regions carry out a set of specific higher-order processes commonly associated with working- and long-term memory tasks. Finally, orbitofrontal cortex and ventromedial PFC are involved in specific aspects of emotion processing.

Keywords:   prefrontal cortex, cognitive control, functional neuroimaging, meta-analysis, emotion

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