Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
AdolescenceGrowing Up in America Today$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Joy G. Dryfoos and Carol Barkin

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780195179613

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195179613.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 23 October 2020

Positive Scenario for the Future

Positive Scenario for the Future

Chapter:
(p.244) (p.245) Chapter Eleven Positive Scenario for the Future
Source:
Adolescence
Author(s):

Joy G. Dryfoos

Carol Barkin

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195179613.003.0011

The previous chapter presented a pessimistic view of the future for American teenagers in the 21st century and asked the question: Does it have to be like that? This chapter argues that it does not, and instead paints a positive scenario. In order to enhance the lives of adolescents and to make sure they grow up into responsible adults, it is important to recognize that interventions have to start long before children are teenagers. How can we help adolescents grow into responsible adults? The key is attachment. The quality of life for everyone is dependent on many factors, but the one that seems to surface most strongly from this analysis is the “value system”: the American people must decide that they want a higher standard of social structures and of quality of life. Young people should also have more access to health and mental health care and quality education. Promotion of healthy and safe sexual behavior, decreasing poverty and increasing wealth equality, and reducing segregation are also important.

Keywords:   teenagers, quality of life, attachment, value system, education, health care, sexual behavior, poverty, segregation

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .