Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Advances in the Spoken Language Development of Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Children$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Patricia Elizabeth Spencer and Marc Marschark

Print publication date: 2005

Print ISBN-13: 9780195179873

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: April 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195179873.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 22 October 2020

Working Memory Capacity, Verbal Rehearsal Speed, and Scanning in Deaf Children With Cochlear Implants

Working Memory Capacity, Verbal Rehearsal Speed, and Scanning in Deaf Children With Cochlear Implants

Chapter:
(p.328) 14 Working Memory Capacity, Verbal Rehearsal Speed, and Scanning in Deaf Children With Cochlear Implants
Source:
Advances in the Spoken Language Development of Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Children
Author(s):

Rose A. Burkholder

David B. Pisoni

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195179873.003.0014

This chapter reviews recent studies which assessed the working memory processes and abilities of deaf children with cochlear implants. Although most of the clinical research examining deaf children using cochlear implants has focused on traditional audiological outcome measures of speech and language skills to assess benefit, important new knowledge about speech and language development has come from recent studies on memory processing abilities in this population. These studies have shown that subvocal verbal rehearsal and serial scanning operate much more slowly in deaf children with cochlear implants and contribute to their shorter memory spans. It appears that slower processing speeds may play an even greater role in the deaf children's memory performance than do the initial encoding problems related to their current hearing impairment and cochlear implant use. In addition, these studies suggest that the amount and/or nature of the auditory exposure which children receive after implantation can influence their performance on immediate memory tasks which require the encoding, verbal rehearsal, and serial scanning of phonological information in working memory.

Keywords:   working memory processes, deaf children, cochlear implants

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .