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The Social Psychology of Intergroup Reconciliation$
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Arie Nadler, Thomas Malloy, and Jeffrey D. Fisher

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780195300314

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2008

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195300314.001.0001

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Majority and Minority Perspectives in Intergroup Relations: The Role of Contact, Group Representations, Threat, and Trust in Intergroup Conflict and Reconciliation

Majority and Minority Perspectives in Intergroup Relations: The Role of Contact, Group Representations, Threat, and Trust in Intergroup Conflict and Reconciliation

Chapter:
(p.227) Chapter 10 Majority and Minority Perspectives in Intergroup Relations: The Role of Contact, Group Representations, Threat, and Trust in Intergroup Conflict and Reconciliation
Source:
The Social Psychology of Intergroup Reconciliation
Author(s):

John F. Dovidio

Samuel L. Gaertner

Melissa-Sue John

Samer Halabi

Tamar Saguy

Adam R. Pearson

Blake M. Riek

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195300314.003.0011

This chapter examines the potential roles of intergroup representations, threat, and trust in the dynamics of intergroup relations between Whites and Blacks. It first explores the psychological processes that promote intergroup bias, threat, and distrust and may lead to intergroup conflict. Second, it examines ways of reducing intergroup bias. Third, it emphasizes the importance of understanding the differing perspectives of majority- and minority-group members on intergroup relations, and illustrates the different dynamics empirically, focusing on Black-White relations within the United States as a case study. The chapter concludes by considering the implications that this conceptualization of the nature and dynamics of intergroup bias has for interventions designed to reduce bias and promote reconciliation.

Keywords:   intergroup conflict, intergroup relations, intergroup bias, Blacks, Whites, reconciliation, distrust

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