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From the Kitchen to the ParlorLanguage and Becoming in African American Women's Hair Care$
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Lanita Jacobs-Huey

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780195304169

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195304169.001.0001

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Critical Reflections on Language, Gender, and “Native” Anthropology

Critical Reflections on Language, Gender, and “Native” Anthropology

Chapter:
(p.129) 7 Critical Reflections on Language, Gender, and “Native” Anthropology
Source:
From the Kitchen to the Parlor
Author(s):

Lanita Jacobs-Huey (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195304169.003.07

This chapter presents critical reflections on language, gender, and native anthropology in relation to hair and its significance to African American women. To assess how “native” is a native anthropologist, this chapter synthesizes commentary by several “native” scholars that interrogates the degree to which their gender and indigenous background authorizes carte blanche status in the field. This chapter also explores the centrality of linguistic and discursive knowledge for native scholars who conduct fieldwork in communities they consider to be “home”; native and feminist scholars' confessions of “failure” in the field and dilemmas of translation of academic writing for non-academic audiences beyond the field; and the political stakes inherent in native scholars' research in places that they in some way consider to be “home”. This discussion demonstrates how dilemmas of ethnography arise in and inform the study of language and gender.

Keywords:   native anthropology, hair, language, gender, native anthropology, African American women

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