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Perceptual ExpertiseBridging Brain and Behavior$
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Isabel Gauthier, Michael Tarr, and Daniel Bub

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780195309607

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: February 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195309607.001.0001

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Congenital and Acquired Prosopagnosia: Flip Sides of the Same Coin?

Congenital and Acquired Prosopagnosia: Flip Sides of the Same Coin?

Chapter:
(p.167) 6 Congenital and Acquired Prosopagnosia: Flip Sides of the Same Coin?
Source:
Perceptual Expertise
Author(s):

Marlene Behrmann

Galia Avidan

Cibu Thomas

Kate Humphreys

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195309607.003.0007

Both congenital prosopagnosia (CP) and acquired prosopagnosia (AP) are characterized by a deficit in recognizing faces, but the former is a failure to acquire face-processing skills in the absence of any obvious sensory, neural, or cognitive disorder, while the latter is the loss of skill as a result of explicit brain injury. Whether the mechanisms affected in CP and AP are the same is not yet clear. For example, patients with CP are better at deriving emotional information from faces, and all patients with AP show abnormal electrophysiological (ERP), magnetoencephalographic (MEG), and neuroimaging profiles, whereas this is not always the case for CP. Studies that directly compare the detailed behavioral and neural signatures of CP and AP will be informative with respect to uncovering the fundamental sequence of acquisition or ordering of the componential processes associated with face recognition.

Keywords:   explicit face recognition, implicit face recognition, emotion recognition, configural processing, eye movements, prosopagnosia, congenital prosopagnosia, acquired prosopagnosia

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