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Neuroscience of Rule-Guided Behavior$
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Silvia A. Bunge and Jonathan D. Wallis

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780195314274

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2007

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195314274.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 20 January 2022

 Exploring the Roles of the Frontal, Temporal, and Parietal Lobes in Visual Categorization

 Exploring the Roles of the Frontal, Temporal, and Parietal Lobes in Visual Categorization

Chapter:
(p.391) 17 Exploring the Roles of the Frontal, Temporal, and Parietal Lobes in Visual Categorization
Source:
Neuroscience of Rule-Guided Behavior
Author(s):

David J. Freedman

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195314274.003.0021

How does the brain recognize the meaning of sensory stimuli? Through experience with the world, individuals easily learn to group stimuli into meaningful categories, such as “chair,” “table,” and “vehicle.” Although much is known about the neural representation of the features of simple visual stimuli (e.g. contrast, orientation, and motion direction), relatively little is known about how the brain learns and represents the behavioral relevance, or category, of stimuli. This chapter reviews a series of recent studies in the macaque monkey using a delayed match‐to‐category task. These studies suggest that single neurons in primate prefrontal, inferior temporal cortex, and parietal cortex play important, although complementary, roles in visual categorization and category learning.

Keywords:   category, delayed match‐to‐category task, macaque monkey, inferior temporal cortex, parietal cortex

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