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Neuroscience of Rule-Guided Behavior$
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Silvia A. Bunge and Jonathan D. Wallis

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780195314274

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2007

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195314274.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 20 January 2022

 Rules through Recursion: How Interactions between the Frontal Cortex and Basal Ganglia May Build Abstract, Complex Rules from Concrete, Simple Ones

 Rules through Recursion: How Interactions between the Frontal Cortex and Basal Ganglia May Build Abstract, Complex Rules from Concrete, Simple Ones

Chapter:
(p.419) 18 Rules through Recursion: How Interactions between the Frontal Cortex and Basal Ganglia May Build Abstract, Complex Rules from Concrete, Simple Ones
Source:
Neuroscience of Rule-Guided Behavior
Author(s):

Earl K. Miller

Timothy J. Buschman

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195314274.003.0022

The understanding of abstract rules is necessary for the development of goal‐directed behavior, and generally has been linked to prefrontal function. However, this chapter puts forward the theory that complex thoughts and actions can actually be “bootstrapped” from simpler ones through the parallel interactions of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and basal ganglia (specifically, the dorsal striatum) via the corticoganglia loops. The relationship between the two structures appears to be that, as the animal learns specific stimulus‐response associations, they are quickly represented in the striatum, which then slowly trains the PFC. The closed circuit loop between the two structures suggests an autoassociative network in which a key component is the ability to learn temporal sequences of patterns and thus make predictions.

Keywords:   basal ganglia, corticoganglia loops, autoassociative network, stimulus‐response associations

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