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Cognitive Neuroscience, Development, and PsychopathologyTypical and Atypical Developmental Trajectories of Attention$
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Jacob A. Burack, James T. Enns, and Nathan A. Fox

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780195315455

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195315455.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 07 December 2021

LINKING EARLY ADVERSITY, BRAIN, AND DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOPATHOLOGY

LINKING EARLY ADVERSITY, BRAIN, AND DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOPATHOLOGY

A REVIEW OF FINDINGS FROM SURVIVORS OF EXTREMELY LOW BIRTH WEIGHT AND CHILD MALTREATMENT

Chapter:
(p.17) ﹛ 2 ﹜ LINKING EARLY ADVERSITY, BRAIN, AND DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOPATHOLOGY
Source:
Cognitive Neuroscience, Development, and Psychopathology
Author(s):

Vladimir Miskovic

Louis A. Schmidt

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195315455.003.0002

Mounting evidence indicates that early life adversity is associated with increased vulnerability for psychiatric impairment across the lifespan. Until recently, most human studies in this field have been epidemiological in nature and focused on linking early life stress to complex clinical outcomes. This chapter advances a developmental psychophysiological model, where the chapter emphasizes the importance of considering the widespread brain systems that exert a strong influence on emotional reactivity and its regulation. This chapter reviews some of the recent work from our research group that has attempted to trace the effects of prenatal insults (using extremely low birth weight as a proxy marker) and those occurring in the postnatal time period (child maltreatment) on the functional integrity of key components within this affective neurocircuitry. The chapter emphasizes the value of non-invasive psychophysiological measures in helping to bridge the developmental pathways between early experience and psychological outcomes.

Keywords:   affective neuroscience, early life stress, developmental psychopathology, clinical psychophysiology

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