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Religion and American PoliticsFrom the Colonial Period to the Present$
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Mark A. Noll and Luke E. Harlow

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780195317145

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195317145.001.0001

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Religion, Politics, and the Search for an American Consensus

Religion, Politics, and the Search for an American Consensus

Chapter:
(p.459) 20 Religion, Politics, and the Search for an American Consensus
Source:
Religion and American Politics
Author(s):

George M. Marsden

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195317145.003.0021

The book closes with this chapter's far-ranging overview of the whole course of religion and politics in America. While much can be gained from the particular conclusions of the book's earlier sections, much can also be learned from an effort to view the picture as a whole. This chapter holds that it is possible to regard American history as a painful struggle to achieve religious consensus on political matters, a struggle that may have witnessed both its culmination and dissolution since the 1960s. It cites the formidable role that religion played during the American colonial era. Throughout the period, a central theme was the extended cold war between Protestants and Catholics.

Keywords:   American politics, religious consensus, American history, colonial era, Protestant, Catholics

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