Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Remembering the HolocaustA Debate$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Jeffrey C. Alexander

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780195326222

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195326222.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 18 January 2022

On the Political Corruptions of a Moral Universal

On the Political Corruptions of a Moral Universal

Chapter:
(p.135) On the Political Corruptions of a Moral Universal
Source:
Remembering the Holocaust
Author(s):

Robert Manne

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195326222.003.0005

In this response to Jeffrey Alexander's chapter, “The Social Construction of Moral Universals,” this chapter offers a somewhat skeptical critique after outlining a political reading of what he has to say. It agrees a great deal with Alexander's account, accepting the basic periodization that the Jewish killings by the Nazis only became the Holocaust sometime in the 1960s. Despite such agreements, the chapter concentrates on some basic misgivings about the case presented by Alexander. Alexander believes no historical event is self-interpreting. There are some difficulties with this kind of popular-cultural explanation of the emergence of the Holocaust as the central moral-political myth of the modern Western world. The chapter argues that the most fundamental misgiving about Alexander's argument is his reading of the place of the Holocaust in contemporary political life.

Keywords:   Jeffrey Alexander, moral universal, political reading, Holocaust, Jewish killings, Nazi, contemporary political life

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .