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Origins and Development of RecollectionPerspectives from Psychology and Neuroscience$
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Simona Ghetti and Patricia J. Bauer

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780195340792

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195340792.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use.date: 28 January 2022

Development of Recollection

Development of Recollection

A Fuzzy-Trace Theory Perspective

Chapter:
(p.101) 5 Development of Recollection
Source:
Origins and Development of Recollection
Author(s):

Charles J. Brainerd

Valerie F. Reyna

Robyn E. Holliday

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195340792.003.0005

This chapter discusses fuzzy-trace theory's (FTT) approach to the development of recollection, the procedures and mathematical models that it uses to measure recollection, and the developmental findings that have accumulated to date from those techniques. It deals with the how of recollection, in the sense of measurement procedures, more than with the what, in the sense of process models of recollection. Although the distinctions that constitute FTT's process model of recollection and familiarity are discussed and figure throughout, the lion's share of the presentation deals with procedures for measuring those distinctions and to the findings that have accumulated. That emphasis grows out of the fact that until recently, the recollection/familiarity distinction has had no appreciable influence on the study of memory development.

Keywords:   memory development, FTT approach, recollection, process models, familiarity

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