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The Development AgendaGlobal Intellectual Property and Developing Countries$
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Neil Weinstock Netanel

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780195342109

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195342109.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 27 November 2020

IPRs and Technological Development in Pharmaceuticals

IPRs and Technological Development in Pharmaceuticals

Who Is Patenting What in Brazil After TRIPS?

Chapter:
(p.293) 13 IPRs and Technological Development in Pharmaceuticals
Source:
The Development Agenda
Author(s):

Francesco Laforgia

Fabio Montobbio

Luigi Orsenigo

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195342109.003.0013

This chapter introduces some of the most salient aspects of the debate regarding the relationships between stronger intellectual property rights (IPRs) regimes, innovation, and development. Despite increased knowledge on the subject, little is known on the relationships between IPRs, innovation, and growth, especially as developing countries are concerned. It focuses on the pharmaceutical patenting activities in Brazil using domestic patent data. Firstly, it shows that the adoption of TRIPs had substantial positive impact on the number of patent applications in Brazil, but that the great majority of these new patent applications have come from nonresidents, most likely as extensions of foreign patents. It is too early to assess if this substantial increase in (foreign) patents is due to pipeline patents or if it will become a permanent characteristic of patenting activity in Brazil. Secondly, it shows the growth of the share of the chemical and pharmaceutical patents compared to other fields.

Keywords:   IPR, intellectual property, patent, drugs, pharmaceutical, TRIPS, Brazil, developing countries, innovation

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