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Making Meanings, Creating FamilyIntertextuality and Framing in Family Interaction$
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Cynthia Gordon

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780195373820

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195373820.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 23 January 2022

“Kelly, I Think That Hole Must Mean Tigger”

“Kelly, I Think That Hole Must Mean Tigger”

Blending Frames and Reframing in Interaction

Chapter:
(p.157) 5 “Kelly, I Think That Hole Must Mean Tigger”
Source:
Making Meanings, Creating Family
Author(s):

Cynthia Gordon (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195373820.003.0005

This chapter examines the process of reframing and identifies blended frames as a third kind of frame lamination. It does so by investigating how language from children's storybooks is repeatedly recontextualized in one extended interaction between one mother and her four‐year‐old daughter. The participants use patterns of repetition to (re)define their interaction and to undertake different activities, including to play in various ways and to display knowledge. The mother also uses repetition as a means of blending play frames and task‐based frames. The chapter compares and contrasts the different laminations identified in chapters 4 and 5. It also discusses how these laminations relate to the cognitive theory of conceptual blending.

Keywords:   reframing, blended frames, play frame, children's storybooks, parenting, conceptual blending, mother‐child discourse, meaning‐making, recontextualization

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