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In God’s EmpireFrench Missionaries and the Modern World$
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Owen White and J.P. Daughton

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780195396447

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195396447.001.0001

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Muslim Princes, Female Missionaries, and Trans-Mediterranean Migrations: The Soeurs de Saint-Joseph de l’Apparition in Tunisia, c. 1840–1881

Muslim Princes, Female Missionaries, and Trans-Mediterranean Migrations: The Soeurs de Saint-Joseph de l’Apparition in Tunisia, c. 1840–1881

Chapter:
(p.109) 5 Muslim Princes, Female Missionaries, and Trans-Mediterranean Migrations: The Soeurs de Saint-Joseph de l’Apparition in Tunisia, c. 1840–1881
Source:
In God’s Empire
Author(s):

Julia Clancy-Smith

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195396447.003.0005

This chapter explores the history of the Soeurs de Saint Joseph de l’Apparition by situating the congregation within the larger context of nineteenth-century imperialism and transnational migrations in Tunisia and the Mediterranean more generally. A variety of factors—from war to shifting labor markets—shaped the missionary sisters’ methods. Focusing on teaching and medical work both intersected with the needs of trans-Mediterranean migration and won the patronage of the Husaynid Dynasty (reigned 1705–1956). The order’s founder and her sisters ceaselessly importuned court officials for assistance in finding suitable residences, which, in a city such as Tunis, then experiencing massive immigration and thus housing shortages, was key to permanent settlement.

Keywords:   Tunisia, Tunis, war, labor markets, housing, missionary sisters, migration

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