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Hindu Revivalism in Bengal c.1872-1905Some Essays in Interpretation$
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Amiya P. Sen

Print publication date: 2001

Print ISBN-13: 9780195655391

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195655391.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 31 July 2021

Their Finest Hour: Hindu Revivalism and Aggressive Propaganda Through the Press and Platform (c. 1880–1904)

Their Finest Hour: Hindu Revivalism and Aggressive Propaganda Through the Press and Platform (c. 1880–1904)

Chapter:
(p.203) Chapter 4 Their Finest Hour: Hindu Revivalism and Aggressive Propaganda Through the Press and Platform (c. 1880–1904)
Source:
Hindu Revivalism in Bengal c.1872-1905
Author(s):

Amiya P. Sen

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195655391.003.0004

This chapter focuses on the peak of Hindu revivalism in Bengal during the period from 1880 to 1905 which was achieved through aggressive propaganda in the press and other platforms. This was a period of distinct upswing in orthodox Hindu thinking and programmes and Brahmo Samaj troubled by its internal weaknesses. It reviews the lives and works of Chandranath Basu, Krishna Prosonno Sen, Pundit Sasadhar Tarkachudamani and major Bangabasi writers including Jogendra Chandra. It explains that while these writers generally ridiculed the social and political philosophy of the Brahmo and the neo-Hindu ideologies, some conservative writers like Indranath Bandopadhyay and Jogendra Chandra were more flexible in adopting the new Bengali prose. The satire of these two writers is indignant and courageous exposure of the confused identities and moral travails of their social world.

Keywords:   orthodox Hindu thinking, Brahmo Samaj, Chandranath Basu, Krishna Prosonno Sen, Pundit Sasadhar Tarkachudamani, Jogendra Chandra, Indranath Bandopadhyay, neo-Hindu ideologies

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