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Enter the KingTheatre, Liturgy, and Ritual in the Medieval Civic Triumph$
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Gordon Kipling

Print publication date: 1998

Print ISBN-13: 9780198117612

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198117612.001.0001

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Fourth Advent: The Civic Triumph as Royal Apocalypse

Fourth Advent: The Civic Triumph as Royal Apocalypse

Chapter:
(p.226) 5 Fourth Advent: The Civic Triumph as Royal Apocalypse
Source:
Enter the King
Author(s):

Gordon Kipling

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198117612.003.0006

The Fourth Advent of Christ, according to St John, will bring about a sacramental union of the saints and Christ. In the Apocalypse, the blessed drink freely of the water of life, eat of the tree of life, and live eternally in the presence of the Lord whom they serve gladly with love. The medieval civic triumph primarily stages the Fourth Advent primarily as a way of celebrating and affirming a new political regime. For the civic triumph, as a consequence of pageants such as these, the Fourth Advent mode usually produces by far the most optimistic and positive royal acclamation. The ‘flourishing’ and ‘prosperity’ that George Kernodle noticed suggest that a loving king and faithful people together might achieve something like that ‘vision of peace’ described by St John.

Keywords:   Fourth Advent, Christ, St John, union, saints, Apocalypse, civic triumph, pageants, George Kernodle

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