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Circles of CensorshipCensorship and its Metaphors in French History, Literature, and Theory$
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Nicholas Harrison

Print publication date: 1996

Print ISBN-13: 9780198159094

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198159094.001.0001

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Conclusion: Tout dire

Conclusion: Tout dire

Chapter:
(p.205) Conclusion: Tout dire
Source:
Circles of Censorship
Author(s):

Nicholas Harrison

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198159094.003.0005

By asserting how the right to communicate opinions and thoughts was ‘one of man's most precious rights’, the 1789 Déclaration des droits de l'home et du citoyen aided in making man into a citizen able to participate actively within the political community. After the Revolution, sources of legitimacy multiplied and changed. Those who felt the effect included secular leaders, the Church, the public, scientists, and those working in the economy. It is important to note that the situation in which various authoritative discourses are heterodox is referred to as heterodoxy, and discourses against censors can no longer be assumed. This concluding chapter summarizes how Sade's work proves to have had a significant contribution to many areas of art through reviewing the studies made by the Surrealists and by the Tel Quel group.

Keywords:   surrealists, Tel Quel, legitimacy, right to communicate, Déclaration, Sade

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