Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Masks of KeatsThe Endeavour of a Poet$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Thomas McFarland

Print publication date: 2000

Print ISBN-13: 9780198186458

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198186458.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 16 June 2021

The Mask of Camelot

The Mask of Camelot

Chapter:
(p.26) 2 The Mask of Camelot
Source:
The Masks of Keats
Author(s):

Thomas McFarland

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198186458.003.0002

For this chapter, we assume two significant configurations — one is represented by the Mask of Camelot while the other accounts for the various understandings, social agreements, and psychological guesses which comprise a figure called John Keats. Because John Keats, in this context, is treated merely as text or as a literary figure, the character can assume a number of different traits, such as the possession of intense sexual passion. Looking, on the other hand, on the Mask of Camelot, we realize that the central male figure in ‘The Eve of St. Agnes’ called Porphyro also has this immense inclination to sexual desires. Porphyro serves as a mask that justifies John Keats's sexual frustrations. It is important to note, however, that both these characters are taken as nothing more than something to intentionally attract a reader's attention, regardless of their contrasting traits.

Keywords:   character, John Keats, Porphyro, mask, literary figure, Mask of Camelot

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .