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A Passion for GovernmentThe Life of Sarah, Duchess of Marlborough$
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Frances Harris

Print publication date: 1991

Print ISBN-13: 9780198202240

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198202240.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 17 June 2021

The Hanoverians 1714–1716

The Hanoverians 1714–1716

Chapter:
(p.203) 14 The Hanoverians 1714–1716
Source:
A Passion for Government
Author(s):

FRANCES HARRIS

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198202240.003.0015

Although the new King may have wished that the troubles of Marlborough should have already reached their end, Sarah perceived that the troubles brought about by the Hanoverian era have just begun. As they were still on their way to England, the Duke discovered that he and Sunderland were not included in the list of Lords Justices who were tasked to continue the government until the King had arrived. The Hanoverians were evidently distrustful about the extremism expressed by Sunderland. Another setback that they experienced as they returned to London was that Sarah's youngest daughter Mary had seemingly cut ties with Sarah. During this period, Sarah was able formally to meet the new King, George I, as she always believed that he was a man of good nature. While the Marlboroughs attempted to restore their family's position within the Court's monopoly, this brought about more conflicts with the Hanoverians.

Keywords:   Hanoverian era, Mary, London, Sunderland, extremism, George I

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