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The English Urban RenaissanceCulture and Society in the Provincial Town 1660-1770$
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Peter Borsay

Print publication date: 1991

Print ISBN-13: 9780198202554

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198202554.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 22 October 2020

Prospects, Planning, and Public Buildings

Prospects, Planning, and Public Buildings

Chapter:
(p.80) 4 Prospects, Planning, and Public Buildings
Source:
The English Urban Renaissance
Author(s):

Peter Borsay

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198202554.003.0004

This chapter focuses on the rising tide of investment in buildings from three standpoints: maps and prospects, planning, and public buildings. Maps and prospects play a very important role in the development of the whole town. These helped in creating a visual image of the entire town in the mind's eye. The role of planning in the development of the town was encouraged by John Wood who introduced planning as a tool for designing and developing a new city. Planning gave the development of new cities a sense of organization. Lastly, public buildings gained in importance during this period because they represented the overall image of the town. Moreover, public building was also seen to symbolize the prosperity, humanity, and prestige of the whole community.

Keywords:   investment, maps, prospects, planning, public buildings, image, community

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