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British Slave Emancipation$
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Green William A.

Print publication date: 1993

Print ISBN-13: 9780198202783

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198202783.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use.date: 27 January 2022

Religion and Education

Religion and Education

Chapter:
(p.327) Chapter 11 Religion and Education
Source:
British Slave Emancipation
Author(s):

William A. Green

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198202783.003.0011

This chapter discusses popular education, which was Britain's instrument of social control in the West Indies. During British rule, education was seen as a means to tame the multitudes, repress social barbarism, and preserve the social status of the colonists. In mid-century Great Britain, education remained the function of religion. People were schooled by catechism in the fundamental precepts of the Christian faith and in their moral responsibilities to each other. Recognizing the disciplinary values of religion and the persuading skills of the missionaries, planters saw the missionaries as possible allies of convenience, as they were capable of stabilizing the labouring population and inculcating the values of social responsibility, thrift, and industry in order to exploit the much-needed workforce contributed by the blacks in sugar plantations.

Keywords:   popular education, social control, education, religion, catechism, Christian faith

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