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The Caroline Captivity of the ChurchCharles I and the Remoulding of Anglicanism 1625-1641$
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Julian Davies

Print publication date: 1992

Print ISBN-13: 9780198203117

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198203117.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 28 November 2021

The Restraint of Preaching

The Restraint of Preaching

Chapter:
(p.126) 4 The Restraint of Preaching
Source:
The Caroline Captivity of the Church
Author(s):

Julian Davies

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198203117.003.0005

This chapter begins by describing Jacobean England during the early seventeenth century as the greatest evangelistic drive before the advent of the Evangelical Revival of the eighteenth century, when the thirst for preaching was deep. It explains that the reason for the royal reaction of 1622 was the threat posed to the king's authority by the wave of controversial preaching that swept the country following the announcement of the Spanish marriage plans and his overtures to Roman Catholics. The chapter discusses that ‘Considerations for the better settling of church government’ with Charles I were adopted and that these considerations constituted a radical programme to bind preaching to the liturgy and discipline of the Church. It then discusses seven Instructions that must be implemented in order to exercise the Considerations and describes the combination lecture and corporation lecture.

Keywords:   preaching, Jacobean England, seventeenth century, Charles I, Considerations, Instructions

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