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The Oxford History of the British Empire: Volume IV: The Twentieth Century$
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Judith Brown and Wm Roger Louis

Print publication date: 1999

Print ISBN-13: 9780198205647

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198205647.001.0001

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Migrants and Settlers

Migrants and Settlers

Chapter:
(p.163) 7 Migrants and Settlers
Source:
The Oxford History of the British Empire: Volume IV: The Twentieth Century
Author(s):

STEPHEN CONSTANTINE

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198205647.003.0007

This chapter provides a discussion on emigration patterns and the consequences of these for the British economy. The role of migration and settlement in the system's sustenance continued deep into the 20th century. The maintenance, even intensification, of Imperial connections is suggested by the continuing flows of emigration from Britain. Emigrants from Britain headed for the existing white settler societies. Possibilities of labour mobility within the 20th-century British Empire were apparently revealed by the immigration into Britain of workers of non-European ethnic origin. It is important not to exaggerate the coherence of the Empire at any period as a region of labour mobility. Especially since the Second World War, modern economies within the Commonwealth have been competing on increasingly equal terms with Britain — and indeed with the United States — for that most valued commodity, which is skilled labour.

Keywords:   British economy, British Empire, emigration, settlement, emigrants, Britain, Commonwealth, labour mobility

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