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The Oxford History of the British Empire: Volume III: The Nineteenth Century$
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Andrew Porter

Print publication date: 1999

Print ISBN-13: 9780198205654

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198205654.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 25 October 2020

Southern Islands: New Zealand and Polynesia

Southern Islands: New Zealand and Polynesia

Chapter:
(p.573) 25 Southern Islands: New Zealand and Polynesia
Source:
The Oxford History of the British Empire: Volume III: The Nineteenth Century
Author(s):

Raewyn Dalziel

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198205654.003.0025

In the mid-nineteenth century, New Zealand became the furthest frontier of the British Empire. By 1914, New Zealand's humpbacked, mountainous, but fertile land had been traversed by Europeans, renamed, and domesticated. New Zealand was annexed by Great Britain in 1840, at a time of supposed low interest in Empire. British control over its nationals in New Zealand was exercised spasmodically from Sydney, usually in response to complaints by Maori or to a beachhead disruption. The gendered nature of migration meant that European men outnumbered women until the 1920s. However, New Zealand was always promoted as a colony for women. The nature of migration and migration flows were determined primarily by economics and secondarily by social factors. The British outreach of the first half of the century had encompassed the islands of Polynesia in addition to New Zealand.

Keywords:   New Zealand, Polynesia, gender, Great Britain, British control, Maori, migration, economics

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