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The Oxford History of the British Empire: Volume III: The Nineteenth Century$
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Andrew Porter

Print publication date: 1999

Print ISBN-13: 9780198205654

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198205654.001.0001

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Imperial Institutions and the Government of Empire

Imperial Institutions and the Government of Empire

Chapter:
(p.170) 9 Imperial Institutions and the Government of Empire
Source:
The Oxford History of the British Empire: Volume III: The Nineteenth Century
Author(s):

Peter Burroughs

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198205654.003.0009

This chapter provides a discussion on the place of British Empire in British politics. Britain's governance of the British Empire involved dynamic processes, not static structures and inert constitutional frameworks, as some earlier imperial historians imagined. Among the various objectives of Imperial policy-makers in managing the Empire's constituent territories, the prime imperative — and major anxiety — remained the preservation of security and loyalty. To deal with awesome global responsibilities, Imperial administrators developed a range of strategies and techniques of management. Political institutions were the most prominent instrument of British rule. Indirect Rule emerged after 1900 as a much-publicized technique of Imperial management. There was nothing new about the tactic of preserving indigenous institutions and acting through the agency of local rulers.

Keywords:   constitutional frameworks, British politics, British government, political institutions, Imperial administrators, Indirect Rule, Imperial policy

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