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European Universities from the Enlightenment to 1914$
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R. D. Anderson

Print publication date: 2004

Print ISBN-13: 9780198206606

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198206606.001.0001

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Students, Professors, and Politics

Students, Professors, and Politics

Chapter:
(p.66) 5 Students, Professors, and Politics
Source:
European Universities from the Enlightenment to 1914
Author(s):

R. D. Anderson

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198206606.003.0005

Between 1815 and 1848, the forces of liberalism and nationalism contended with those of reaction orchestrated by the Austrian chancellor Metternich. Governments generally expected universities to enforce political and religious orthodoxy. University professors and students, mostly drawn from the growing middle class, had a central part in these conflicts. In Germany, the Burschenschaft student movement voiced the demand for German national unity, but was severely repressed after 1819. In France and Italy, professors and students were often involved in political movements, sometimes violent, in the 1820s and during the 1830 revolutions. A particularly dramatic episode was the Polish rising against Russian rule in 1830, which led to the suppression of Vilna University and the diffusion of Polish intellectual exiles. During the 1848 revolutions, students were active on the liberal side in Germany, at Vienna, and in France.

Keywords:   Metternich, 1830 revolutions, 1848 revolutions, liberalism, nationalism, Burschenschaft, Poland, Vilna, Vienna

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