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Urban Liberalism in Imperial GermanyFrankfurt Am Main, 1866–1914$
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Jan Palmowski

Print publication date: 1999

Print ISBN-13: 9780198207504

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198207504.001.0001

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Conclusion

Conclusion

Chapter:
(p.311) 7 Conclusion
Source:
Urban Liberalism in Imperial Germany
Author(s):

Jan Palmowski

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198207504.003.0007

This chapter deals with the important question of why Frankfurt liberals were unable to pass on their vitality to their respective liberal parties at the state and national levels. After 1900, Frankfurt left liberals acted as lynchpins to left-liberal unification, owing to their good relationships in the city itself, and to the influence they enjoyed among left liberals in northern and southern Germany. It argues that without Frankfurt left-liberals, unification would not have happened. In the couple of years after unification in 1910, Frankfurt liberals retained a strong influence on the Progressive People's Party, both formally and informally. The example of Frankfurt portrays liberals in the cities as innovative, pragmatic, and politically astute. Frankfurt liberals themselves also had a strong urge to spread their social ideals and their political values. However, they were unsuccessful.

Keywords:   Frankfurt liberals, left liberals, Germany, unification, social ideals, liberal parties

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