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The Business of DecolonizationBritish Business Strategies in the Gold Coast$
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Sarah Stockwell

Print publication date: 2000

Print ISBN-13: 9780198208488

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198208488.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 28 September 2021

Strategies for Decolonization: Constitutional Change and the Campaign for Business Representation

Strategies for Decolonization: Constitutional Change and the Campaign for Business Representation

Chapter:
(p.111) 4 Strategies for Decolonization: Constitutional Change and the Campaign for Business Representation
Source:
The Business of Decolonization
Author(s):

Sarah Stockwell

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198208488.003.0004

The inauguration of African self-government entailed some loss of privilege for British capitalist interests in the Gold Coast. Not only did the constitutional changes of 1951 sweep aside the old Legislative Council on which British business interests had been represented, replacing it with a new elected assembly, but the devolution of power from the Colonial Office in London to nationalists in Accra rendered the metropolitan focus of expatriate firms' business associations increasingly inappropriate. Companies in all sectors set about ensuring that British firms would have adequate representation in the new assembly. When this strategy ultimately proved unsuccessful, businessmen focused on constructing alternative representation in Accra. The differences that had earlier prevented British merchant firms adopting a collective approach were largely overcome, further highlighting the impact of constitutional change on British business. The importance of securing effective vehicles for promoting business interests in anticipation of and then following constitutional change, was explicit throughout and can appropriately be regarded as a strategy for decolonization.

Keywords:   Gold Coast, self-government, British business, constitutional change, devolution, Accra, business representation, merchant firms, decolonization

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