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Decision-Making in the UN Security CouncilThe Case of Haiti, 1990-1997$
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David Malone

Print publication date: 1998

Print ISBN-13: 9780198294832

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198294832.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 28 October 2021

Authorization for the Use of Force and Aristide's Return, December 1993-October 1994

Authorization for the Use of Force and Aristide's Return, December 1993-October 1994

Chapter:
(p.98) 6 Authorization for the Use of Force and Aristide's Return, December 1993-October 1994
Source:
Decision-Making in the UN Security Council
Author(s):

David Malone

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198294832.003.0006

This chapter discusses the events surrounding Aristide's return to Haiti. It also describes the role of the UNSC and the United States in the authorization for the use of force to restore democratic rule in Haiti. Aristide pressed hard for a complete trade embargo, including humanitarian aid as the sole means of forcing the military regime to back down. On 15 September, President Bill Clinton delivered a nationally televised speech indicating that military action was imminent. Under the threat of US-led intervention and the pressure from the UN Security Council Resolution 940, the military leaders relinquished power, and US troops were deployed by President Clinton to handle the transition. Aristide returned to Haiti on 15 October as president. The same day, the UNSC lifted all measures imposed against Haiti.

Keywords:   UNSC, United States, trade embargo, President Bill Clinton, UN Security Council Resolution 940, Aristide, Haiti, military regime

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