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The Neuropsychology of Vision$
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Manfred Fahle and Mark Greenlee

Print publication date: 2003

Print ISBN-13: 9780198505822

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198505822.001.0001

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Vision, behaviour, and the single neuron

Vision, behaviour, and the single neuron

Chapter:
(p.2) (p.3) Chapter 1 Vision, behaviour, and the single neuron
Source:
The Neuropsychology of Vision
Author(s):

Gregor Rainer

Nikos K. Logothetis

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198505822.003.0001

This chapter starts by describing some of the historical developments that represent the origins of single-neuron recording and first attempts to relate the observed neural activity to behaviour. It also provides an overview of the cortical areas of the monkey that process visual information and discusses some of the relevant literature for each area. It then reviews more specifically the progress that has been made in the understanding of different regions of the monkey brain by recording the activity of single neurons. The studies outlined in this chapter represent only a small sample of the wealth of information that has been collected by recording the activity of single neurons in monkeys. Nevertheless, it shows that important progress has been made, not only in the understanding of the representation of sensory stimuli, but also in uncovering neural correlates of cognitive operations such as attention, decision-making, or associative memory formation.

Keywords:   vision, behaviour, single neuron, neural activity, monkey, cortex

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