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Neural and Behavioural PlasticityThe Use of the Domestic Chick as a Model$
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R. J. Andrew

Print publication date: 1991

Print ISBN-13: 9780198521846

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198521846.001.0001

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The avian and mammalian forebrain:correspondences and differences

The avian and mammalian forebrain:correspondences and differences

Chapter:
(p.65) 2 The avian and mammalian forebrain:correspondences and differences
Source:
Neural and Behavioural Plasticity
Author(s):

J. L. Dubbeldam

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198521846.003.0003

This chapter provides a general outline of the avian forebrain, discussing the organization of specific regions of the avian forebrain and comparing it to that of mammals. Birds and mammals make up the two classes of homoiothermic vertebrates. The two groups have many features in common, and differences in other aspects. Their forebrains have completely different appearances in the cross-section. Homology and analogy are not mutually exclusive. In comparative anatomy a set of criteria is needed to recognize the homology of elements. The criteria include the pattern of connections (hodology), histochemical characteristics and embryological data. In cross-sections a number of thick cell layers can be recognized that are called palaeostriatum, neostriatum, hyperstriatum and ectostriatum. Impressive differences in organization and cytoarchitectonic differentiation exist between the brains of different groups of birds, some of which may be related to behavioural specializations of the respective species. The chapter reviews some histochemical data to see its effect on the forebrain organization.

Keywords:   avian forebrain, homoiothermic vertebrates, cross-section, histochemical characteristics, cytoarchitectonic differentiation

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