Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Parasitism and Ecosystems$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Frédéric Thomas, François Renaud, and Jean-François Guegan

Print publication date: 2005

Print ISBN-13: 9780198529873

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2007

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198529873.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 21 October 2020

Parasitism, biodiversity, and conservation

Parasitism, biodiversity, and conservation

Chapter:
(p.124) CHAPTER 8 Parasitism, biodiversity, and conservation
Source:
Parasitism and Ecosystems
Author(s):

Frédéric Thomas (Contributor Webpage)

Michael B. Bonsall

Andy P. Dobson (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198529873.003.0009

Parasites are thought to have a key role in determining the structure of animal communities. Most of the evidence for this is based on how different host species vary in their susceptibility to infection or its consequences. This chapter reviews the current theoretical and empirical knowledge on this topic. It then argues and illustrates the role that parasites can have in engineering ecological processes via their effects on a host’s phenotype and on the resources — biotic or abiotic — available to hosts and their competitors. These ideas are discussed in relation to possible management strategies for conservation.

Keywords:   apparent competition, engineering effect, species coexistence, ecosystem stability

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .