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Cicely SaundersSelected Writings 1958-2004$
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Cicely Saunders

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780198570530

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198570530.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 19 October 2021

The Treatment of Intractable Pain In Terminal Cancer

The Treatment of Intractable Pain In Terminal Cancer

First published in Proceedings of the Royal Society of Medicine, vol. 56, no. 3 (March 1963), pp. 195–7 (Section of Surgery, pp. 5–7).

Chapter:
(p.61) 10 The Treatment of Intractable Pain In Terminal Cancer
Source:
Cicely Saunders
Author(s):

Cicely Saunders

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198570530.003.0010

This paper is widely cited as a landmark contribution in the discussions about terminal care that were beginning to take place in the United Kingdom in the early 1960s. Published in 1963 and based on a talk given to its members, it sees Cicely Saunders entering the heartlands of the Royal College of Physicians, and the Section of Surgery at that. Her paper draws on research work at St Joseph's and compares problems and treatments in some 900 patients. The paper concentrates not on the drugs used with these patients, but rather the methods of their deployment. The ‘cardinal rules’ are set out: careful assessment of the symptoms that trouble the patient, assessment of the nature and severity of pain, and the regular giving of drugs.

Keywords:   United Kingdom, symptom assessment, terminal care, severity, Royal College of Physicians

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